Tuesday, August 15, 2006

Flying

RedMonk's O'Grady (can't remember if he's Steven or Stephen right now and I'm offline so I'll just call him by his last name and nobody will ever discover my ignorance...) talks about Bruce Schneier's take on the latest Airline security scare.

I am just about to transition (temporarily) into a different role and I suspect my need to fly will be minimal for the rest of the year. But, were I still doing Europe-wide consulting, I think the latest incident would be the one that made me stop flying... and it wouldn't be because of the fear of terrorism or the "newly discovered" risk.

Rather, the intolerably excessive restrictions that have been brought in, the unbearable conditions at checkin/security and the monotony of flying with no laptop and no iPod mean there's no way I would want to fly anywhere.

So I guess the "bad guys" have won: had my job not done it first, they'd have (temporarily at least) stopped me flying.

3 comments:

Andrew Ferrier said...

Just a quick point: some of the restrictions have been relaxed:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/4793175.stm

I think your general point still stands though: if I were BA or suchlike, I would be infuriated that the government holds such sway over my business based on their 'intelligence'. The primary problem is that liquids are still banned, and by the looks of things might remain so permanently. If so, this could be another nail in the coffin of air travel: the lucrative business class travellers will be put off by the need to check their overnight toiletries in.

This really makes me question whether my plan to fly to Edinburgh next weekend, rather than take the train, was a worthy use of the ~60 quid extra it cost.

Andrew Ferrier said...

Just a quick point: some of the restrictions have been relaxed:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/4793175.stm

I think your general point still stands though: if I were BA or suchlike, I would be infuriated that the government holds such sway over my business based on their 'intelligence'. The primary problem is that liquids are still banned, and by the looks of things might remain so permanently. If so, this could be another nail in the coffin of air travel: the lucrative business class travellers will be put off by the need to check their overnight toiletries in.

This really makes me question whether my plan to fly to Edinburgh next weekend, rather than take the train, was a worthy use of the ~60 quid extra it cost.

Richard Brown said...

the lucrative business class travellers will be put off by the need to check their overnight toiletries in.

Apparently eos customers were well looked after... Suddenly Stansted and business-class-only airlines look very attractive :-)